Australian Women’s Masters secure silver at 20th World Championships

Australia was well represented at the 20th CMAS Underwater Hockey World Championships held recently in Quebec, Canada, fielding teams in all four divisions (Elite Women's, Elite Men's, Masters Women's and Masters Men's).

The event, which ran from July 19 to 29, saw more than 600 players and officials from 16 Underwater Hockey playing nations converge on the beautiful French Canadian city for two-weeks of high intensity competition.

The Masters Women's team were the best performed of the Australian contingent, returning with silver medal, after playing France in the World Championship game.

Masters Women on the podium

The Australian Masters Women on the podium at the 20th CMAS Underwater Hockey World Championships. [Photo: Mike Martyn]

Following solid performances in the round robin the team entered the knock-out stages as the third seed and proceeded on a charmed run into the championship game, a 6-0 win over Argentina in the quarterfinal was followed by a gritty 2-1 win over Colombia in the semifinal. The Australian women started the World Championship game strongly, attested by the 1-1 halftime scoreline. With the game well and truly in the balance, the early stages of the second half was hotly contested but as players began to tire, the French team's fitness began to tell. A number of quick goals to the French put the result beyond doubt. The 6-1 final scoreline was bolstered by a number of late goals to the French.

Australian Masters Women

The Australian Masters Women stand for the national anthem prior to the championship game versus France. [Photo: Mike Martyn]

The other three Australian teams did not fare quite as well. The Australian Elite Men's team finished the round-robin as the 3rd seeded team in Group A (with a W-D-L record of 4-1-1) but suffered a nail-biting 1-2 loss to Turkey in the quarterfinal. They went on to finish the competition in 7th place after defeating Spain 3-2 in the 7th v 8th play-off game.

The Elite Women and the Men's Masters teams both finished the competition in 6th place. The Elite Women sat as the third seed in Group B at the conclusion of the round-robin (with a 3-1-2 record) but suffered a 3-5 defeat in the quarterfinal at the hands of a strong South African team. Their final standing following a gallant 0-2 defeat in the 5th v 6th game against the French women. The Masters Men's team was defeated by GB 0-1 in the quarterfinal.

The 2018 Australian World Championship contingent. [Photo: Mike Martyn]

The Australian teams were accompanied by a significant support contingent, headlined by team managers Andrew Robert-Tissot and Mike Martyn as well as the exceptionally hardworking physio team of Nick Stepkovitch, Jolanta Lewandowska, Marleen van Gastel, Katie Turner and Marlissa Dijk.

A complete list of results and the final standings can be viewed online at https://uwhscores.com/t/worlds2018 and replays of all championship games can be streamed online at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnOBvfJcIdm9QeKn7zdECNA.

The next CMAS Underwater Hockey World Championships for the Elite and Masters divisions will likely be held in Australia in 2020.

Calling for player expressions of interest for the 2013 Australian Teams

Dear Players,

As many of you will know the 2013 CMAS World Championships will be held in Eger, Hungary. This should be a fabulous competition and I know Columbia, South Africa, Great Britain, New Zealand, Argentina and Canada have already put in nominations. I have attached the information pack for you.

On behalf of UHA I need to know who is planning to nominate for selection. I know it is impossible to say for certain what you will be doing almost one year away but we need to have a reasonable idea of what teams we can commit to as we have to pay the deposit for accommodation by 30th Nov.

The aim is to field teams in the following divisions:

  • U19 Women
  • U19 Men
  • U23 Men
  • Elite Women
  • Elite Men
  • Women’s Masters
  • Men’s Masters

The plan is for the Elite and Masters teams to leave Australia on 14th August, to start training on 16th August. The U19 and U23 teams will leave Australia on 17th August to start training on 19th August.

The accommodation I have tentatively booked is the Bulls Blood package which means we have transfers from Budapest to Eger and back, accommodation is five minutes walk from the pool, three meals per day, 3 1/2- 4 star and I have specified I want air conditioning.

Below I have done some rough costings. Please be aware they are dependent on currency fluctuations , possible changes in flight costs and do not include training camps

Please email me as soon as you can if you are going to try out or not (I am as keen to know from as many players as possible - both yes and no) on uwhmum@hotmail.com. I definitely need to know by 1st November.

Thanks,
Sandra Milner
Australian Team Manager

Approximate costs

  • U19 = $5800
  • U23 = $5400
  • Elites/Masters = $5530

Please email me for a full breakdown of costs.

Download the CMAS Hungary Information Pack (PDF 1.6MB)

 

CMAS Underwater Hockey World Championships, Portugal

Australia sent an Elite Men's and Elite Women's team to the 17th CMAS Elite World Championship of Underwater Hockey held in Coimbra, Portugal from 16 - 27 August 2011.

The Australian Men and Women's teams

The Australian Men and Women's teams.

Results

Australian Elite Men win gold

The Australian Men's team won gold with a 6 - 1 win over South Africa in the World Championship game.

The win ended a drought of sorts for the Australian Men as it was their first title since the 2002 win in Calgary. They did it in style, the 6-1 scoreline was the largest margin in a World Championship Men's final for more than a decade.

The Australian Men's team celebrates their World Championship win

The Australian Men's team celebrates their World Championship win

The boys made their way through a very even round robin stage in unspectacular fashion. Six wins, two draws (to Great Britain and South Africa) and one loss (to France) was solid but uninspiring.

It looked as though it would leave them as the third placed seed. However, a surprise loss by France to Turkey in the final round robin game saw Australia leap frog the French in the standings and enter the finals as the second seed.

This meant a quarter final match up against a hard working Great Britain team who had proved stiff competition in their drawn round robin match. While it was a tight and hard fought contest, Australia progressed to the semi-final with a workmanlike 4-2 win.

France loomed has their semi-final opponent after atoning for their stock round robin loss with a massive 13-0 win over the Turks in a controversial quarter final. Following a spiteful first half the French played uncontested for most of the second half - swimming in goal after goal - when the Turkish team refused to contest the game due to perceived umpiring bias.

The two teams have a history of producing close matches in the pointy end of the competition.  The teams had met in the semi finals in the previous two World Championships and in both cases the French had prevailed in extra time. As such, there was no shortage of motivation amongst the Australia boys to put in a big effort. In an intense and physical encounter an unselfish team performance saw the Australian boys reverse the result of previous years winning 3-2 to book themselves a ticket to the big dance.

Australia's opponent in the final was a South African team that had progressed undefeated through the competition. Spectators arrived at the pool expecting a close match but in the minds of many the South African team was the strong favourite to take out the title.

In a close and frantic opening saw the puck move from end to end. Blake Sutcliffe got on the end of a solid multi phase drive from the middle of the court to score the first  goal four minutes into the game. Nick Yong extended the lead when his break away resulted in Australia's second goal at the midway point of the first half.

South Africa reduced the margin shortly after.  With Australia a man down in the sin bin the South Africans where able to take advantage of a penalty in front of goal to score.

The game see-sawed back and forward for the remainder of the half but neither team was able to penetrate the opposition defence. Halftime saw Australia hold a 2-1 lead.

South Africa opened the second half strongly but the Australian defence held firm. A sustained counter attack saw the Aussie boys work the puck up the pool before scoring their third goal four minutes in.

Tom Miller had the opportunity to stretch the lead shortly after when he found himself in the clear in three metres out from goal but a wayward flick over the top of the goal allowed the South Africans to clear the puck. Thankfully for him the Australian boys were able to lock the play in their attacking third and score a minute or so later.

Nick Yong looked to have put the result beyond doubt shortly afterwards when his break away goal stretched the lead out to 5-1. The South African's had other ideas and next four minutes saw them make a  sustained attack on goal. Once again the Australian defensive structures held strong.

Another Australian goal in the final minutes of the game stretched the margin out to 6-1 and ensured the largest margin in a World Championship Men's final in more than a decade.

The win reasserted Australia's dominance in the international Men's division and delivered a tenth World Championship title from the 16 competitions we have contested.

Australian Elite Women win silver

The Australian Women's team collected Silver, losing 1 - 3 to Great Britain in a closely fought World Championship decider.

The Australia Women's team on the podium

The Australia Women's team on the podium

The Australian girls record of five wins, one draw (with France) and one loss (to Great Britain) saw them finish the round robin stage as the second seed.

The GB team had defeated them quite comfortably 5-1 in the early stages of the round robin but the Australian's gave themselves every chance in the final after their impressive run through the finals. They defeated Canada 5-1 in their quarter final match then followed it up with 5-0 win over France in the semi-final.

The final was a high skill and physical exchange. The GB girls skipped out to an early lead before the Australian girls pegged back a goal. Another first half GB goal saw that margin sit at 2-1 at halftime.

The Australian girls came out after the break all guns blazing but the GB were able to absorb the pressure before putting the result beyond doubt with a third goal.

Find out more

The Australian Men's teams journey to Gold.

Worlds photos:

Do you have any other pics from this competition to share with us? We are particularly looking for names and photos of each of the teams that played in this competition. Please email communicationsofficer@underwaterhockeyaustralia.org.au with any photos including the date and competition that was played and the names of the people in the photo.